Planning bathroom remodeling in Sarasota FL can be an intimidating process. There’s more to consider than just aesthetics and style, and where do you start? Why not start from the bottom up – with new tile. Since humidity and water damage can cause large problems that can take a lot of money to repair, the density, water-resistance, and finish of the tile you choose are vital to a well-functioning bathroom. Since some tiles are more prone to water damage, the following list provides the types and finishes of tiles best suited for humid weather.

Porcelain Tile

Porcelain tile is incredibly strong and will provide you with peace of mind more than any other type of tile. When it has a glazed finish, porcelain tile’s water absorption rate is less than 0.5 percent, meaning that even if you were to take a shower and spill a little water on the floor, it would have no issue resisting absorption. This makes the risk of humidity and water damage drop significantly, as opposed to more viscous materials, such as stone or wood flooring.

In addition to its low water absorption rate, porcelain tile also has a breaking strength of over 450 pounds, making it the strongest, most water-resistant, and reliable type of bathroom floor tile. The main downside to porcelain tiling is that it is more expensive than other types of tiling.

Ceramic Tile

Ceramic tile is a great choice for the budget-conscious buyer and for humidity-prone areas as long as you get a glazed finish. Glazed ceramic tiles are not the most resistant to water (their water absorption rate falls between 0.5 and 3 percent), but they are cost effective. The density of the ceramic also creates a strong floor (breaking strength is normally at 400 pounds) that will last for years with the proper care. Since ceramic is slightly less water-resistant than porcelain, it is best to mop it weekly and to wax it once a year for it to remain effective in fighting back humidity and water damage.

Because of the humidity, the best bathroom floor tiles in Orlando, Florida, are porcelain and ceramic due to their low water absorption rates. As long as you get a glazed finish, either type will work.